Proposal preview

Big Business and Corporate Governance in 20th-century India

In the 1960s, several government committees were set up in India to examine the concentration of economic power and a unique structure of corporate governance, known as the managing agency system, that had evolved over a century. The end result of the deliberations was the abolition of the managing agency system in 1970 and a series of policies aimed at reducing the concentration of corporate power, giving rise to the license raj. The consequences of these policies are widely debated today even as the genesis of the issue remains under-researched.
In this context, this panel proposes to study the corporate landscape of India in the 20th century and identify factors associated with the emergence of big business and the changing character of the managing agency system.
Themes we would like to explore include:
• The impact of globalisation and de-globalisation during the 20th century on the corporate sector
• Corporate governance structures in firms within and outside the managing agency system
• Sector-specific narratives on big business and corporate governance
• The significance of corporate law and mergers and acquisitions in aiding the rise of big business
• The role of joint ventures and ‘technology transfers’ in the Nehruvian economy
• The structure of multinational corporations in three periods: interwar, post-war and post-liberalisation.
• The evolution of banking and industrial finance and stock markets

Organizer(s)

  • Chinmay Tumbe, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, chinmayt@iima.ac.in, India
  • Aparajith Ramnath, Indian Institute of Management Kozhikode, apconf@gmail.com, India

Session members

  • Chinmay Tumbe, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, chinmayt@iima.ac.in
  • Aparajith Ramnath, Indian Institute of Management Kozhikode, apconf@gmail.com
  • Amol Agrawal, Indian Institute of Management Bangalore, amol.agrawal13@iimb.ernet.in
  • Stefan Tetzlaff, German Historical Institute London, stefan.tetzlaff@gmail.com
  • Tirthankar Roy, London School of Economics, t.roy@lse.ac.uk

Proposed discussant(s)

  • Tirthankar Roy, London School of Economics, t.roy@lse.ac.uk