Proposal preview

THE ECONOMY OF ADORNMENT: CLOTHING CULTURES AND CONTACT ZONES IN THE FIRST GLOBAL AGE, c. 1500-1800

The increasing contact between different populations after 1500 was mediated in a number of ways and made visible through dress. Dress – the material adornment of bodies through cloth, feathers, body-art and accessories – was carefully recorded by European travellers and explorers to all continents. Populations resident in the Americas, Asia and Africa, whose knowledge systems were plumbed by newcomers over time, also noted dress systems of incomers, their deficiencies as well as their benefits. This panel addresses these sustained interactions as reflected in patterns of dress in the so-called first global age (c. 1500-1800). The panel brings interdisciplinary perspectives to cultural approaches to the study of the early modern global economy. We pay particular attention to the regions, localities and ‘contact zones’ as conveyed in material patterns of clothing and consider the economic consequences of these patterns.

Organizer(s)

  • Beverly Lemire, University of Alberta, lemire@ualberta.ca,
  • Giorgio Riello, University of Warwick, g.riello@warwick.ac.uk,

Session members

  • Evelyn Welch, King's College London, evelyn.welch@kcl.ac.uk
  • Dana Leibsohn, Smith College, d.leibsoh@smith.edu
  • Giorgio Riello, University of Warwick, g.riello@warwick.ac.uk
  • Molly Warsh, University of Pittsburgh, warsh@pitt.edu
  • Miki Sugiura, Hosei University, mikisug@hotmail.com
  • Sophie White, Notre Dame University, swhite1@nd.edu
  • Beverly Lemire, University of Alberta, lemire@ualberta.ca

Proposed discussant(s)

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